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Mortgage Types


There are many types of mortgages available on the market and it can be confusing to know which one is right for you, so we have outlined the basics below. To seek further advice from one of our truly independent financial advisers qualified to give mortgage advice, (link to contact us) today.

Repayment mortgages
With this type of mortgage, you repay part of the amount borrowed together with the interest being charged each month. In the earlier years of your mortgage, the majority of your monthly repayment is made up of interest. However, towards the latter part of your mortgage term, the situation is reversed and the majority of your monthly payment will deduct from the amount borrowed.

Interest-only mortgages
With this type, you are only paying interest each month. This means that although your payments will be lower, the amount you borrow will still be outstanding at the end of the mortgage term. You will need to have credible arrangements to pay off the mortgage to avoid the property having to be sold, such as an Individual Savings Account (ISA).

Flexible mortgages
You can vary the amount you pay each month and take payment holidays in some circumstances. It may help to reduce your mortgage with lump sum payments without incurring an early repayment charge.

Offset mortgages
Typically, a current account, savings account, or both, are linked to your mortgage and, each month, the amount in these accounts is then offset against your outstanding mortgage. You are unlikely to earn interest on your savings which are offset.

Mortgage Interest rates


Standard Variable Rates (SVR)
With this type of rate, your payments should rise and fall in line with the Bank of England bank rate changes, but not necessarily at the same time or by the same amount.

Fixed rates
Fixed rates give you the security of knowing that your monthly payments will always be the same. With this type of mortgage, you pay a fixed rate of interest for a set period typically over two, three or five years.

Tracker variable rates
Tracker variable rates are usually linked to the Bank of England bank rate, which means they will change in line with this.

Capped rates
With a capped rate mortgage, you will know the maximum you will pay for a set period of time. This type of mortgage offers you the option of knowing the maximum monthly repayments you would have to make during a set period of, typically, two or three years.

Discount variable rates
Allows you to benefit from a discount on the lender's standard variable rate. If the lender's standard variable rate (SVR) increases or decreases, so does the discounted rate. Typically, the shorter the discounted period the larger the discount.


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